Cruelty Free.

Are Your Products Tested on Animals?

It’s a sad fact that animal testing is still a thing. Yes, certain companies in the skin care and beauty realm still test their products and ingredients on animals, and it’s more prevalent than you may think.

Cruelty Free - Are Your Products Tested on Animals ryan-mcguire

Though I’m not usually a fan of the whole ‘name and shame’ thing, as I try to invest my time and energy into the positive, I would like to highlight these companies. So let’s get into it. Here are just some of the beauty and skin care companies that currently test their products and ingredients on animals:

Andrew Collinge
Anna Sui
Aramis
Aveeno
Avon*
Band-Aid
Biotherm
Bobbi Brown
Bonjela
Braun
Cacharel
Cashmere Bouquet
Chapstick
Clairol
Clean & Clear
Clearasil
Clinicare
Clinique
Colgate
Covergirl*
Crest
Decore
Disprin
Dolce & Gabbana
Donna Karan
Dove
Dufour
Durex
Elizabeth Arden
Estee Lauder*
Eulactol
Fruitrience
Garnier
Gillette
Giorgio Armani
Gucci Fragrances
Head & Shoulders

Herbal Essences
Hugo Boss
Impulse
Johnson & Johnson
Jurlique*
Kerastase
Kiehl’s
Lacoste
Lancome
Lemsip
Listerine
L’Occitane*
L’Oreal*
Lux
Lynx
MAC
Mary Kay*
Max Factor
Maybelline
Michael Kors
Missoni
Mum
Nair
Neutrogena
Nice ‘n Easy
Nurofen
Olay
Old Spice
Optrex
Oral B
Palmolive
Pantene
Pearl Drops
Pears
Pert
Plax
Ponds
PPS

Radox
Ralph Lauren Fragrances
Reach
Redken
Revlon
Rexona
Rogaine
Sanex
Saturn
Savlon
Scholl
Sensodyne
Shiseido
Shu Uemura
Simple
SK-II
Speed Stick
St Ives
Stayfree
Steradent
Strepsils
Tampax
Tom Ford
Tommy Hilfiger
Tony & Guy
TREsemme
Vaseline
Veet
Venus
Vicks
Vidal Sasson
Viktor & Rolf
V05
Waxeeze
Wella
Wella Balsam
Zest

Indicates a company that currently sells into places (such as China), where it is mandatory to test products on animals, prior to human use/consumption. These companies do have a ‘no animal testing’ policy in the make and manufacture of their cosmetics.

Altogether, that’s 112 companies that are still living in the Dark Ages, I mean, that test on animals (my apologies for the Freudian slip). This is by no means an exhaustive list. The data here is from Animals Australia, and in fact they go on to list a further 70 or so household companies that currently conduct tests on animals.

Did you know that the correlation between animal toxicity and human toxicity is only somewhere between 5–25% accurate? Pitiful. And, that the US Department of Health admits almost 80% of new drugs that have passed animal tests have proved ineffective or even harmful to humans? So not only is it morally bankrupt performing these tests, but it’s inaccurate and sometimes even dangerous to our health.

According to Choose Cruelty Free, the National Cancer Institute believes we have actually lost cures for cancer that proved ineffective in mice. Mice? I’m sorry, but could we be any more different to a mouse. Well maybe if we were a Komodo Dragon, but that’s not my point. Animals are different to humans, hence they metabolise drugs differently, plus their… everything is different! Different skin, different sensitivities, different internal systems, different lifestyles. I think you get where I’m coming from here.

There are certain intellectual-types out there such as Professor Andre McLean of University College, London who also believe that animal testing is ‘a waste of everybody’s time and a fearful waste of animals.’ So why then, do these tests continue?

MONEY

According to Choose Cruelty Free, ‘animal experimentation is a multi-billion pound business.’ Not dollars, pounds. ‘A multi-billion pound business.’ Lab mice sales alone account for around 200 million pounds per year. Plus there are suppliers of cages that profit, animal breeders and of course pharmaceutical companies.

Better alternatives to animal testing exist of course. Such as using DNA chips (“a collection of microscopic DNA spots attached to a solid surface.”), and even testing micro-doses that are risk-free in human volunteers. There is also test-tube research, studying sectors of the population, autopsies and other complimentary research methods such as MRI scanning. All ethical, consensual and effective. Oh, and minus the whole animal torture thing.

Stop Testing on Animals - Cruelty Free ricky-kharawala

All hope is definitely not lost. Currently, countries such as New Zealand, India and the EU have made it illegal to conduct tests on animals for cosmetic purposes. In fact since March 2013, the EU even banned the sale of cosmetics that have been tested on animals. I guess there’s hope for us lot yet.

“Things do not change; we change.”

– Henry David Thoreau

A great place to start when looking for ethical companies is the Choose Cruelty Free List. There’s a process of getting accreditation with them, whereby the brand has to fill out a lengthy form detailing where/who they purchase their ingredients from. Plus they have to provide written statements from their ingredient suppliers that no animal testing has ever, or at the very least, not in the last 5+ years, conducted tests on animals, and has no intention of doing so in the future. I know, because we went through that process last year with lewin & reilly. It was (and still is) a necessity for us to make sure people know our brand is cruelty free.

Because we like to support other brands rocking the ethical space too, here’s our pick of the bunch from the CCF list. Enjoy beautiful, animal-loving people:

Kester Black Nail Polish

Kester Black Nail Polish

Zuii Organic

Zuii Organic Mineral Blush Powder

Ecostore

Ecostore Dishwash Liquid

Nb: There have recently been a few changes made to the mandatory animal testing laws in China, as follows:

China cosmetics animal testing after 30 June:

  • Foreign imported ordinary cosmetics — still require animal testing
  • Domestically produced ordinary* cosmetics — animal testing no longer an absolute requirement
  • Both foreign imported and domestically produced ‘special use’** cosmetics — still require animal testing
  • Domestically produced ordinary cosmetics for foreign export only — have never required animal testing
  • Any cosmetic bought in China via a foreign e-commerce website — has never required animal testing.

*‘Ordinary’ cosmetics include make-up, fragrances, skin, hair and nail care products.
 ** ‘Special-use’ cosmetics include hair dyes, perms and hair growth products, deodorants, sunscreens, skin-whitening creams, and other products that make a functional claim on the label.

Source: HSI.org

Cruelty Free.

Are Your Products Tested on Animals?

It’s a sad fact that animal testing is still a thing. Yes, certain companies in the skin care and beauty realm still test their products and ingredients on animals, and it’s more prevalent than you may think.

Cruelty Free - Are Your Products Tested on Animals ryan-mcguire

Though I’m not usually a fan of the whole ‘name and shame’ thing, as I try to invest my time and energy into the positive, I would like to highlight these companies. So let’s get into it. Here are just some of the beauty and skin care companies that currently test their products and ingredients on animals:

Andrew Collinge
Anna Sui
Aramis
Aveeno
Avon*
Band-Aid
Biotherm
Bobbi Brown
Bonjela
Braun
Cacharel
Cashmere Bouquet
Chapstick
Clairol
Clean & Clear
Clearasil
Clinicare
Clinique
Colgate
Covergirl*
Crest
Decore
Disprin
Dolce & Gabbana
Donna Karan
Dove
Dufour
Durex
Elizabeth Arden
Estee Lauder*
Eulactol
Fruitrience
Garnier
Gillette
Giorgio Armani
Gucci Fragrances
Head & Shoulders

Herbal Essences
Hugo Boss
Impulse
Johnson & Johnson
Jurlique*
Kerastase
Kiehl’s
Lacoste
Lancome
Lemsip
Listerine
L’Occitane*
L’Oreal*
Lux
Lynx
MAC
Mary Kay*
Max Factor
Maybelline
Michael Kors
Missoni
Mum
Nair
Neutrogena
Nice ‘n Easy
Nurofen
Olay
Old Spice
Optrex
Oral B
Palmolive
Pantene
Pearl Drops
Pears
Pert
Plax
Ponds
PPS

Radox
Ralph Lauren Fragrances
Reach
Redken
Revlon
Rexona
Rogaine
Sanex
Saturn
Savlon
Scholl
Sensodyne
Shiseido
Shu Uemura
Simple
SK-II
Speed Stick
St Ives
Stayfree
Steradent
Strepsils
Tampax
Tom Ford
Tommy Hilfiger
Tony & Guy
TREsemme
Vaseline
Veet
Venus
Vicks
Vidal Sasson
Viktor & Rolf
V05
Waxeeze
Wella
Wella Balsam
Zest

Indicates a company that currently sells into places (such as China), where it is mandatory to test products on animals, prior to human use/consumption. These companies do have a ‘no animal testing’ policy in the make and manufacture of their cosmetics.

Altogether, that’s 112 companies that are still living in the Dark Ages, I mean, that test on animals (my apologies for the Freudian slip). This is by no means an exhaustive list. The data here is from Animals Australia, and in fact they go on to list a further 70 or so household companies that currently conduct tests on animals.

Did you know that the correlation between animal toxicity and human toxicity is only somewhere between 5–25% accurate? Pitiful. And, that the US Department of Health admits almost 80% of new drugs that have passed animal tests have proved ineffective or even harmful to humans? So not only is it morally bankrupt performing these tests, but it’s inaccurate and sometimes even dangerous to our health.

According to Choose Cruelty Free, the National Cancer Institute believes we have actually lost cures for cancer that proved ineffective in mice. Mice? I’m sorry, but could we be any more different to a mouse. Well maybe if we were a Komodo Dragon, but that’s not my point. Animals are different to humans, hence they metabolise drugs differently, plus their… everything is different! Different skin, different sensitivities, different internal systems, different lifestyles. I think you get where I’m coming from here.

There are certain intellectual-types out there such as Professor Andre McLean of University College, London who also believe that animal testing is ‘a waste of everybody’s time and a fearful waste of animals.’ So why then, do these tests continue?

MONEY

According to Choose Cruelty Free, ‘animal experimentation is a multi-billion pound business.’ Not dollars, pounds. ‘A multi-billion pound business.’ Lab mice sales alone account for around 200 million pounds per year. Plus there are suppliers of cages that profit, animal breeders and of course pharmaceutical companies.

Better alternatives to animal testing exist of course. Such as using DNA chips (“a collection of microscopic DNA spots attached to a solid surface.”), and even testing micro-doses that are risk-free in human volunteers. There is also test-tube research, studying sectors of the population, autopsies and other complimentary research methods such as MRI scanning. All ethical, consensual and effective. Oh, and minus the whole animal torture thing.

Stop Testing on Animals - Cruelty Free ricky-kharawala

All hope is definitely not lost. Currently, countries such as New Zealand, India and the EU have made it illegal to conduct tests on animals for cosmetic purposes. In fact since March 2013, the EU even banned the sale of cosmetics that have been tested on animals. I guess there’s hope for us lot yet.

“Things do not change; we change.”

– Henry David Thoreau

A great place to start when looking for ethical companies is the Choose Cruelty Free List. There’s a process of getting accreditation with them, whereby the brand has to fill out a lengthy form detailing where/who they purchase their ingredients from. Plus they have to provide written statements from their ingredient suppliers that no animal testing has ever, or at the very least, not in the last 5+ years, conducted tests on animals, and has no intention of doing so in the future. I know, because we went through that process last year with lewin & reilly. It was (and still is) a necessity for us to make sure people know our brand is cruelty free.

Because we like to support other brands rocking the ethical space too, here’s our pick of the bunch from the CCF list. Enjoy beautiful, animal-loving people:

Kester Black Nail Polish

Kester Black Nail Polish

Zuii Organic

Zuii Organic Mineral Blush Powder

Ecostore

Ecostore Dishwash Liquid

Nb: There have recently been a few changes made to the mandatory animal testing laws in China, as follows:

China cosmetics animal testing after 30 June:

  • Foreign imported ordinary cosmetics — still require animal testing
  • Domestically produced ordinary* cosmetics — animal testing no longer an absolute requirement
  • Both foreign imported and domestically produced ‘special use’** cosmetics — still require animal testing
  • Domestically produced ordinary cosmetics for foreign export only — have never required animal testing
  • Any cosmetic bought in China via a foreign e-commerce website — has never required animal testing.

*‘Ordinary’ cosmetics include make-up, fragrances, skin, hair and nail care products.
 ** ‘Special-use’ cosmetics include hair dyes, perms and hair growth products, deodorants, sunscreens, skin-whitening creams, and other products that make a functional claim on the label.

Source: HSI.org